Metal Decorating

Made in America

Epic is proud to say our products are truly made in the USA. We are a fully integrated engineering and manufacturing company. From designing custom coaters, to cutting and painting sheet metal and wiring electrical panels – it is all done in our 40,000 sq. foot facility in Arlington, Texas by over 30 dedicated engineering and production employees. Many members of our team are true artisans, a great number of whom have worked over 25 years at Epic. We are proud of our loyal workforce and grateful for their hard work and craftsmanship. So when considering the various coating and dampening solutions in the marketplace, consider the fact that Epic’s solutions are designed, manufactured and assembled in the USA.

 

Epic production team assembling and testing a WebCoat200

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Can Tech Vietnam

Epic Products has been supplying Asian three-piece can manufacturers with Delta Dampening Systems for many years. For the first time however, we participated in a regional conference sponsored by CanTech. Over 350 suppliers and manufactures from all over Southeast Asia assembled at the beautiful Rex Hotel in Central Ho Chi Minh City to discuss the intricacies of the Asian metal packaging market.

Mike Barisonek, Epic’s VP of Sales & Marketing was a featured presenter discussing the Challenges of Ink-Water Balance, an excellent opportunity for Epic to showcase our products. He also had a chance to meet face-to-face with long-time customers and meet many potential customers. Listening to the outstanding keynote addresses given by local producers and touring a Crown facility, brought things into even better prospective. The region offers significant potential, the economies are growing and three-piece cans remain a very viable packaging option!

Mike taking in some local sights

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Epic’s Delta Dampening Helps Crown Win Best in Show

Philadelphia, PA – July 27, 2011. CROWN Aerosol Packaging North America, received two “Excellence in Quality” awards from the International Metal Decorators Association (IMDA), including the “2011 Grand Award” honor. IMDA presented the awards to Crown in recognition of its printing capabilities on limited edition packaging for WD-40 Company’s “Support Our Troops” campaign. The collectible series of aerosol cans were created to honor American military forces.

The series consisted of four different can designs that contained a wide range of colors: three depicting the United States’ air, sea and land forces and one combined graphic, titled ‘Honor,’ showcasing all five branches of the military, including the Coast Guard. The “Sea/Navy” can, combining blues and greens, won the “Best of Category” award in the aerosol class, while the “Honor” design, containing a wide range of blue shades, was singled out among all the entries for the event’s top prize: 2011 Grand Award.

Crown’s winning aerosol cans are the result of close collaboration with the WD-40 Company and its design agency. Crown worked with the concept designs early in the development process to more efficiently evaluate how each image would appear when actually on the printing press. This step proved invaluable, as it allowed the graphics teams to make adjustments to accommodate the complex colors, including WD-40’s signature blue. Crown’s graphic experts provided color correction and blending support and also ensured that common design elements across the four graphics, such as the military stars, all retained the same level of intensity.

Crown also conceived a “jumbled” printing strategy that placed all four designs on a single printing plate to ensure that designs would be pre-mixed on the pallets being shipped to contract fillers around the United States. The typical printing process for aerosol cans calls for a single graphic design to be printed on a flat sheet of metal, which ultimately would have required a labor intensive hand sorting process to achieve the same mix.

“Just having been able to participate in this project was an honor for Crown, as it pays tribute to members of our Armed Services around the world. It also makes being recognized by IMDA for the work on this project especially meaningfull,” said Brad Dahlgren, Vice President, Sales and Marketing, CROWN Aerosol Packaging North America. “It’s a testament to the skill of our graphics team in Aurora, Illinois, and demonstrates the powerful results that can come from working in close partnership with our customers.”

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Two Centuries of Three Piece Cans

Penny Laurann from Canmaking News Reports

 

Canning has been used to preserve and package food for two centuries. During this time, the three piece can has been an enduring and traditional container which has evolved as the industry developed. The basic principles of canning have not changed in the 200 years since the technique was first developed, but the techniques of Canmaking have undergone continuous refinements. This feature looks at the history and development of the three piece industry staple.

Stages in making a three-piece welded can

  1. Steel strip arrives at the can manufacturing plant in large coils.
  2. Steel strip is cut into large sheets
  3. To protect the can from corrosion and prevent interaction between can and contents, lacquer is applied to the side of the sheets that will become the internal surfaces of the finished cans
Lacquering

With nearly 90 years experience in making coatings and lacquers for metal–packaging Akzonobel was one of the first suppliers to the can market. It provides a range of internal and external coatings for food and drink packaging, including its Diaflex, Aquaprime, Aqualure and Vitalure and Vitalac coatings ranges. AkzoNobel recently perfected Aqualure 915 specifically for thin walled DWI cans. Aqualure 915, is an ultra-flexible lacquer which flexes with the new lightweight steel cans, yet still retains a perfect barrier to protect the drinks. The company innovations include Aquaprime 186 a tactile coating as used by brewers Heineken.

Metal Decoration

Increasingly the modern trend is to print the labelling onto the metal. For hygiene reasons, labels for food cans are usually made of paper and added after filling and cooking.

Printing onto tin plate requires specialist expertise, and the coat must be rub resistant and impervious to oil and moisture. With the high cost of tin plate and the demand for flawless print, metal decorators strive to control waste and quality.

By retrofitting a metal press with Epic’s Delta Dampening System, virtually defect-free printing can be achieved – minimizing waste, reducing press down time and saving hours of product inspection. The improved print quality, combined with the efficiencies gained in productivity, result in a rapid return-on-investment. Epic says that the system can be retrofitted to all makes and models of presses.

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